Love & Sex

Gay Porn Might Be More Prevalent in Your Sexual Repertoire Than You Think

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Written by Quentin Hack

While watching porn doesn’t necessarily speak to your personal sexual tendencies, if you are a fan— you may be more open-minded than you think.

Being a product of the 90s “keep it gay”, “don’t be gay”, and really just “gay”, all became colloquialisms for something that was far removed from sexuality. In fact, there was a super cringey time where “you’re so gay” even became the loving affirmation that nearly all cis-gendered women of my era gave to their heteropartners. While times have definitely changed, and we’re all hyper-aware of the problematic fallout that this language represents, something beneficial did seem to stick.

And that something was a continued social normalization of homosexuality, bisexuality, and sexual fluidity. In modern days, internet hubs like Porndoe are rolling out bisexual and gay porn in almost equal amounts to that of the hetero porn they post. Roughly 8% of hetero-identifying individuals in the US have admitted to bisexual encounters, and according to a massive US national survey in 2019, the number of adults who are perfectly comfortable with homosexual/bisexual relationships quadrupled from the number of those who had any sense of chill in the 90s. Which means that newer generations are becoming more comfortable with the idea of sexual fluidity— and not just in their favorite pornos, but in practice and culture as well.

When it comes to new generations, sexual fluidity is something they accept with open arms. According to a recent Gallup survey based on over 15,000 interviews conducted on Americans age 18 and up, one in six gen-Z adults identify as gay or LGBT.

Phillip Hammack, a psychology professor and director of the Sexual and Gender Diversity Laboratory at the University of California at Santa Cruz, has pointed out a few reasons as to why new generations are experiencing a huge increase in numbers of those who identify as LGBT. And one of the biggest reasons according to Hammack? The internet. Young adults of today can turn to youtube, porn sites or chat rooms to explore thier sexuality from the privacy of their own mobile device. While in the 90’s, internet use for many people was limited to libraries or shared family computers.

So, it’s not that there are more individuals that identify as LGBT today than there were 20 years ago. It’s that people today have the power to dive deeper and more freely in their sexual exploration, thanks to internet and it’s abundance of all kinds of porn.

Straight Men Watch Gay Porn Too

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In the wild, wonderful, and sometimes raunchy world of porn, most people seem to believe that how you orientate yourself sexually is directly related to the kind of porn you watch. Whether this means that gay people watch gay porn, pedophiles watch Lolita porn, and Sci-fi geeks stick to the outer limit, or something similar. But in reality, this absolutely isn’t true. You see, porn represents fantasy, not real life. Think about how you love a good thriller. Are you planning on going all John Wayne Gracey on the world? Unlikely. Maybe you’re into LARPing, does that mean you actually live in a kingdom of elven beauties Monday-Friday? Also, unlikely.

The thing about fantasy— sexual or otherwise— is that it doesn’t necessarily showcase our deepest, real-life, desires; instead, it just speaks about the things that mentally engage us. Things that ignite our imaginations and give us entry into a playful world that is separate from our own. Which is something just about all of us could use a healthy dose of right about now. Porn is no different. In fact, it’s been found that about 1 in 5 straight males watch queer porn. While still fully living that straight life with zero repressed compulsions. Just the stones to be able to admit that in their fantasy world, they like to mix it up a bit. And really, there’s no shame in that.

Hetero Women Love Homoerotica

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More than just straight dudes getting down with a little male on male love, women are also massive fans of gay porn, and everything in between. While it’s still (for some unknown reason) comes as news that women watch any porn, what people are finding is that women use search terms like ‘cunnilingus’ and ‘lesbian’ more often than men— by about 901% and 132% respectively. As it’s highly unlikely that only the lesbian communities are using streaming porn sites, what’s more likely is that there are a bunch of straight women out there that just want to see some good old fashioned gay porn to get their fantasy motors running.

In fact, women’s porn selections were found to be way more fluid than that of the average man, engaging with all sorts of bodies doing all sorts of things, while men tended to stay in the “big boobs, blonde hair” lane. Which could speak to several studies which have suggested that women have much more fluid sexual identities and appetites, something that becomes ever more nebulous with age.

Just About Everyone Watches Bisexual Porn

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The truth is, whether or not you’re ready to run a train in real life, the idea of orgies, threesomes, or tumultuous, multi-faceted sexual experiences appeals to a mass majority of people. Group sex, pan sexuality, bisexual simultaneous intercourse, whatever you want to call it— is something that a huge number of men are interested in, roughly 82% according to one study. Which could suggest that men— and not just their vagina owning counterparts— are much more comfortable with fluid sexualities than originally thought.

But, seeing as how threesomes don’t just grow on trees (sorry peeps, but you’re in luck, porn exists), most people who are turned on by the idea head to the humble online porn platform in order to get their kicks. In nearly all threesome porn, whether it is heralded by female-female-male, or male-male-female, setups, there is almost always an element of bisexuality involved in what is happening on screen. Which doesn’t necessarily mean there is an entire world of stuck-in-the-closet bisexuals, but instead that sexuality may not be as binary as we all thought.

About the author

Quentin Hack