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How Do You Choose the Proper Pool Finish – 2021 Guide

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Written by John Marmolejo

When building a pool, many people tend to focus on the size and shape of the pool first, leaving the additional features like seating, ledges, finishing and more for later. To be fair, that is not wrong by no means, it just tends to be overlooked, especially when it comes to finishing. People just go for the simple, usual option that’ll make their pool like bright and blue and they settle for it. However, that doesn’t have to be that way. You have the possibility to customize your pool as much as you like and you shouldn’t waive that.

With that being said, it’s easy to get lost and overwhelmed with all the possibilities, so we’ve decided to help you out a little bit. We’re going to talk about the pool finishes and what are the things to pay attention to and take into consideration for your pool to look as good as possible. So, let us take a look at a few options for pool finishes and some additional stuff you might need to include in your decision.

Consider the surroundings

When deciding on the colour of the finishing and the accent border of your pool it’s advised to consider how will it all look as a unit. You don’t want your accent tiles to differentiate a lot from your pool or the surroundings. Keep the colour and style of the whole thing in mind when deciding. They may look really good by themselves, but how will they fit with your landscaping, outdoor furniture, pool deck and so on.

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Don’t forget about the feel

The finishes not only vary in colour, they vary in texture. So, that can affect the feel of your pool in more than one way. The thing people mostly focus on is the colour, but don’t forget about the texture. You might want your pool to feel silky smooth, so when you decide on a colour, check out the texture as well. Of course, it’ll feel slightly different because it not going to be submerged in the water, but you’ll get the overall feel. If you’d like a textured feel, you can found finishes like those as well.

Choose classics

Thing is, the pool is most likely not something you’ll change any time soon, so going with a classic, traditional look. Maybe the pink finish is all the rage now, however, it might not be in 5 or 10 years. Think about the future. You might end up regretting not going for a classic Mediterranean look.

Now, let’s talk about the actual finishes. It’s not just the colour and how well the pool matches your backyard, it’s the quality and the type of finish itself that determines the look of your pool. So, unless you know all your options, you shouldn’t make the final decision.

  • Plaster finish

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The classic and the most common surface finish is the plaster finish. In recent years it has lost a bit of its popularity, but it’s still fairly common. You can either go with the traditional white plaster to achieve that timeless, classic appearance. It’s a safe choice being classic, you can’t really go wrong with this one. The plaster is the most inexpensive option and it usually lasts about 8 years before any cracks or other signs of deterioration appear. Experts like www.poolresurfacingchandler.com recommend dealing with cracks and other problems as soon as possible so you don’t compromise the integrity of your pool. Also, it’s highly customizable when it comes to colour, but people often opt-out for somewhere between white and almost black, depending on the look you’re trying to achieve.

  • Aggregate finish

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This is essentially an upgraded version of a plaster pool surface. It’s the combination of plaster with other elements like quartz or glass beads to give a more luxurious feel to your pool. It’s a great option for those who want a more unconventional look to their pool. Bonus points for being more durable and resistant to chemicals than the lone plaster option. You can expect these to last at least 15 years. You can either have a smooth polished or an exposed textured version of this finish. Both of them are pretty much exactly like they sound. Polished aggregate is a smooth, glass-like surface and exposed aggregate will offer you with a fine texture and are great if you want to achieve a tropical or a beach look.

  • Tile finish

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Tile finishes are one of the most durable pool finishes. Although they are commonly found only around the edges of the pool or like an accent, nothing is stopping you from finishing your whole pool with tiles. There are many options to choose from here. Tiles vary in size, shape, colour or material from which they are made off. This means, your imagination is the only limit when it comes to customization. Like we’ve said, they are the most durable option, but they are the most expensive one as well, which kind of makes sense. Essentially, with proper maintenance tiles should last you a lifetime.

Ceramic and porcelain tiles are the most popular and inexpensive options out there. They come in various shapes and sizes, and of course, the colours. The beauty of these tiles is that they can be customized in any way imaginable. You can paint on them, you can create mosaics, you can mix and match, whatever you please.

Stone tiles are also widely popular because they give out a natural feel to your pool. They are amazing if you’re looking for something that can easily blend with any surroundings, yet still offer a modern look and feel. You can also customize them as much as you like, but that’s not really common.

Glass tiles are something that has become popular recently. It’s the most expensive option out there, but it delivers on both look and quality. The glass is non-porous, which means no stains, no algae build-up and minimal maintenance. Also, the glass will make your pool shine in direct sunlight like nothing you’ve ever seen before.

All of these finishes are good in their own way, it’s up to you to decide what’s the look and feel you’re going for and chose accordingly. You can even mix and match, possibilities are endless.

About the author

John Marmolejo